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National Geographic
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Photos by @carltonward | You could say I've been chasing ghosts for the past few years. I set up base camp in the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge in 2016 to begin my Path of the Panther project with @insidenatgeo. I was developing camera trap systems to photograph the elusive endangered panthers in the South Florida swamps. The biologists living in the trailer next to mine were there in pursuit of a different kind of ghost—the rare and revered ghost orchid. They were using a simple game camera in an attempt to capture the first ever photos of a ghost orchid being pollinated. That's when my orchid distraction began. What started as an excuse to make weekly paddle trips into the Fakahatchee  Strand soon grew into a three-year-long obsession to help solve one of the great mysteries of the Everglades—what pollinates the ghost orchid. I hung custom-made camera traps above the water and pointed infrared laser triggers just above delicate ghost orchid flowers. I fine-tuned the method and tried for two years but failed to capture any pollinators. I tried again for a third summer, and fellow Nat Geo explorers @macstonephoto and @peter_houlihan (second photo) joined the quest. Peter had been studying ghost orchids in the Fakahatchee for six years, and Mac had first proposed the idea of camera trapping them a few years earlier. Mac's old-growth forest project gave him an excuse to hang a camera trap 50 feet (15 meters) up in an ancient cypress tree at Audubon's Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary, where a "super ghost" blooms throughout the summer. Please stay tuned over the next week to learn what we discovered together. #ChasingGhosts #everglades
3 часа назад
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Photos by @carltonward | You could say I've been chasing ghosts for the past few years. I set up base camp in the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge in 2016 to begin my Path of the Panther project with @insidenatgeo. I was developing camera trap systems to photograph the elusive endangered panthers in the South Florida swamps. The biologists living in the trailer next to mine were there in pursuit of a different kind of ghost—the rare and revered ghost orchid. They were using a simple game camera in an attempt to capture the first ever photos of a ghost orchid being pollinated. That's when my orchid distraction began. What started as an excuse to make weekly paddle trips into the Fakahatchee  Strand soon grew into a three-year-long obsession to help solve one of the great mysteries of the Everglades—what pollinates the ghost orchid. I hung custom-made camera traps above the water and pointed infrared laser triggers just above delicate ghost orchid flowers. I fine-tuned the method and tried for two years but failed to capture any pollinators. I tried again for a third summer, and fellow Nat Geo explorers @macstonephoto and @peter_houlihan (second photo) joined the quest. Peter had been studying ghost orchids in the Fakahatchee for six years, and Mac had first proposed the idea of camera trapping them a few years earlier. Mac's old-growth forest project gave him an excuse to hang a camera trap 50 feet (15 meters) up in an ancient cypress tree at Audubon's Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary, where a "super ghost" blooms throughout the summer. Please stay tuned over the next week to learn what we discovered together. #ChasingGhosts #everglades
3 часа назад
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Photos by @elias.williams | In 1860 enslaved Africans arrived in Mobile, Alabama, aboard Clotilda, the last known slave ship to arrive in the United States—the result of an illegal bet, made 52 years after the international slave trade was abolished. After arrival, the ship was burned and sunk in a remote area of the Mobile River. In 1865 slavery was abolished, and Clotilda survivors had no way to return to Africa. They would go on to purchase land and found a tight-knit, self-reliant community named Africatown, where many of their descendants live today. For more than a century, the remains of the Clotilda have been a mystery. Last May, a team of underwater archaeologists announced that the ship was discovered. 
These are the descendants of Clotilda survivors Cudjo Lewis, Charlie Lewis, Pollee Allen, and Ossa Keeby, descendants who  keep their heritage alive.

Cousins Attevese Lumbers-Rosario and Ralphema Lumbers are descendants of Cudjo Lewis, one of Africatown’s most notable founders. He lived until 1935, and was one of the longest lived survivors. Ralphema Lumbers wears a T-shirt with a photo of Lewis, taken about 1927.

Lorna Gail Woods is one of Africatown’s historians and the great-great-granddaughter of Charlie Lewis. The oldest of the Clotilda captives, he settled an area that became known as Lewis Quarters, where some of his 200-plus descendants still live.

Vernetta Henson is the great-great granddaughter of Pollee Allen, who worked as a lumber stacker and in his productive garden to provide for his 15 children.

Karliss Hinton is an Army veteran and descendant of Ossa Keeby. Keeby was likely a fisherman on the Kebbi River in northwestern Nigeria before he was captured. He and his wife, Annie, became successful farmers, raised nine children, and owned several plots of land.
7 часов назад
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Photos by @elias.williams | In 1860 enslaved Africans arrived in Mobile, Alabama, aboard Clotilda, the last known slave ship to arrive in the United States—the result of an illegal bet, made 52 years after the international slave trade was abolished. After arrival, the ship was burned and sunk in a remote area of the Mobile River. In 1865 slavery was abolished, and Clotilda survivors had no way to return to Africa. They would go on to purchase land and found a tight-knit, self-reliant community named Africatown, where many of their descendants live today. For more than a century, the remains of the Clotilda have been a mystery. Last May, a team of underwater archaeologists announced that the ship was discovered. 
These are the descendants of Clotilda survivors Cudjo Lewis, Charlie Lewis, Pollee Allen, and Ossa Keeby, descendants who  keep their heritage alive.

Cousins Attevese Lumbers-Rosario and Ralphema Lumbers are descendants of Cudjo Lewis, one of Africatown’s most notable founders. He lived until 1935, and was one of the longest lived survivors. Ralphema Lumbers wears a T-shirt with a photo of Lewis, taken about 1927.

Lorna Gail Woods is one of Africatown’s historians and the great-great-granddaughter of Charlie Lewis. The oldest of the Clotilda captives, he settled an area that became known as Lewis Quarters, where some of his 200-plus descendants still live.

Vernetta Henson is the great-great granddaughter of Pollee Allen, who worked as a lumber stacker and in his productive garden to provide for his 15 children.

Karliss Hinton is an Army veteran and descendant of Ossa Keeby. Keeby was likely a fisherman on the Kebbi River in northwestern Nigeria before he was captured. He and his wife, Annie, became successful farmers, raised nine children, and owned several plots of land.
7 часов назад
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Photos by @elias.williams | In 1860 enslaved Africans arrived in Mobile, Alabama, aboard Clotilda, the last known slave ship to arrive in the United States—the result of an illegal bet, made 52 years after the international slave trade was abolished. After arrival, the ship was burned and sunk in a remote area of the Mobile River. In 1865 slavery was abolished, and Clotilda survivors had no way to return to Africa. They would go on to purchase land and found a tight-knit, self-reliant community named Africatown, where many of their descendants live today. For more than a century, the remains of the Clotilda have been a mystery. Last May, a team of underwater archaeologists announced that the ship was discovered. 
These are the descendants of Clotilda survivors Cudjo Lewis, Charlie Lewis, Pollee Allen, and Ossa Keeby, descendants who  keep their heritage alive.

Cousins Attevese Lumbers-Rosario and Ralphema Lumbers are descendants of Cudjo Lewis, one of Africatown’s most notable founders. He lived until 1935, and was one of the longest lived survivors. Ralphema Lumbers wears a T-shirt with a photo of Lewis, taken about 1927.

Lorna Gail Woods is one of Africatown’s historians and the great-great-granddaughter of Charlie Lewis. The oldest of the Clotilda captives, he settled an area that became known as Lewis Quarters, where some of his 200-plus descendants still live.

Vernetta Henson is the great-great granddaughter of Pollee Allen, who worked as a lumber stacker and in his productive garden to provide for his 15 children.

Karliss Hinton is an Army veteran and descendant of Ossa Keeby. Keeby was likely a fisherman on the Kebbi River in northwestern Nigeria before he was captured. He and his wife, Annie, became successful farmers, raised nine children, and owned several plots of land.
7 часов назад
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Photos by @elias.williams | In 1860 enslaved Africans arrived in Mobile, Alabama, aboard Clotilda, the last known slave ship to arrive in the United States—the result of an illegal bet, made 52 years after the international slave trade was abolished. After arrival, the ship was burned and sunk in a remote area of the Mobile River. In 1865 slavery was abolished, and Clotilda survivors had no way to return to Africa. They would go on to purchase land and found a tight-knit, self-reliant community named Africatown, where many of their descendants live today. For more than a century, the remains of the Clotilda have been a mystery. Last May, a team of underwater archaeologists announced that the ship was discovered. 
These are the descendants of Clotilda survivors Cudjo Lewis, Charlie Lewis, Pollee Allen, and Ossa Keeby, descendants who  keep their heritage alive.

Cousins Attevese Lumbers-Rosario and Ralphema Lumbers are descendants of Cudjo Lewis, one of Africatown’s most notable founders. He lived until 1935, and was one of the longest lived survivors. Ralphema Lumbers wears a T-shirt with a photo of Lewis, taken about 1927.

Lorna Gail Woods is one of Africatown’s historians and the great-great-granddaughter of Charlie Lewis. The oldest of the Clotilda captives, he settled an area that became known as Lewis Quarters, where some of his 200-plus descendants still live.

Vernetta Henson is the great-great granddaughter of Pollee Allen, who worked as a lumber stacker and in his productive garden to provide for his 15 children.

Karliss Hinton is an Army veteran and descendant of Ossa Keeby. Keeby was likely a fisherman on the Kebbi River in northwestern Nigeria before he was captured. He and his wife, Annie, became successful farmers, raised nine children, and owned several plots of land.
7 часов назад
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Photos by @lucasfogliaphoto | Hotel guests enjoy a swim in the pool as rush-hour traffic backs up on the street below. The Parkroyal Collection on Pickering Street contains over 15,000 square meters (almost four acres) of greenery, amounting to twice its land area. In Singapore, 100 percent of the population is urban. The Singapore Green Plan promotes conservation of the nation’s natural resources and the use of green technology, and nature is being reincorporated into the city.
12 часов назад
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Photos by @lucasfogliaphoto | Hotel guests enjoy a swim in the pool as rush-hour traffic backs up on the street below. The Parkroyal Collection on Pickering Street contains over 15,000 square meters (almost four acres) of greenery, amounting to twice its land area. In Singapore, 100 percent of the population is urban. The Singapore Green Plan promotes conservation of the nation’s natural resources and the use of green technology, and nature is being reincorporated into the city.
12 часов назад
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Photo by @estherhorvath | Station Nord is a military and climate science post, and the northernmost base on Greenland. It's home to six Danish soldiers on a two-year tour—and two dogs.  Besides being on polar bear lookout, the dogs provide comfort and company for the soldiers. The dogs are treated like family, and they occasionally may even get a "pedicure." Here soldier Kasper Kruse clips nails as Jasper Juul Hansen cradles the dog. This is an outtake from "Eyes on The Ice," published in the September issue. #Greenland #behindthescenes
15 часов назад
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Photo by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto | Layers of larch, birch, and pine make for a typical Hokkaido landscape. #niseko #hokkaido #Japan #snowscape
19 часов назад
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Photo by @gabrielegalimbertiphoto | Whenever I meet people on my travels, I ask the same question: Can I see what’s in your medicine cabinet? Noorjaha Sagri, 56, her husband, Abbas Ali Sagri, 67, and (from left) their children, Faisal, 24, Heena, 17, and Rafiq, 22, live in a one-room flat in the Dharavi slum in Mumbai, India. At night they pull out mattresses and all sleep in one room. The parents do not work, but the children do sporadically and are the only source of income for the family. Abbas has suffered a stroke, so most of the medicines visible are for his use. #pills #pharma #bigpharma
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Photo by @paulnicklen | My eighth assignment for National Geographic was a behavioral piece on one of the fastest fish to ever exist in our oceans: the sailfish. Written by Jennifer Holland, "In the Whirl: Sailfish" was published in the September 2008 edition. The biggest challenge was to shoot a full-length feature in only 11 days. When you're short on time in a demanding and competitive job, little voices of doubt sneak in and start to tell you that you're going to fail. At the time I wondered: how could I ever pull off a story in 11 days? It seemed absurd. A typical assignment length was anywhere from 50 to 80 days. Fortunately, we had an amazing team for the sailfish piece which made it possible. My buddy Goran Ehlme and I put our heads together with local fishermen and our wonderful Mexican guides and managed to produce a small feature story with only a few good hours of lucky shooting. Follow me @PaulNicklen to learn more about my experiences as a @NatGeo photographer, as well as how I've honed my craft in the decade since I took this photo. #Gratitude #UnderwaterPhotography #HardWork #FailureIsNotAnOption
день назад
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Photos by @timlaman | Cheryl Knott started her wild orangutan research project in Borneo with a Nat Geo Society grant in 1994. Here are a few retrospective shots from that first year of fieldwork, which we spent together (we're married) in the rainforest. Studying wild orangutans is tough work, but Cheryl and her team have persevered for 25 years to shed light on the behavior of this now critically endangered species. If you are in Toronto, come hear our NatGeo Live presentation “Adventures Among Orangutans” Feb 23-25. Or to learn more about Cheryl’s work, follow @savegporangutans. #GunungPalungNationalPark #orangutans #borneo #Indonesia #savewildorangutans
день назад
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Photos by @timlaman | Cheryl Knott started her wild orangutan research project in Borneo with a Nat Geo Society grant in 1994. Here are a few retrospective shots from that first year of fieldwork, which we spent together (we're married) in the rainforest. Studying wild orangutans is tough work, but Cheryl and her team have persevered for 25 years to shed light on the behavior of this now critically endangered species. If you are in Toronto, come hear our NatGeo Live presentation “Adventures Among Orangutans” Feb 23-25. Or to learn more about Cheryl’s work, follow @savegporangutans. #GunungPalungNationalPark #orangutans #borneo #Indonesia #savewildorangutans
день назад
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Photos by @timlaman | Cheryl Knott started her wild orangutan research project in Borneo with a Nat Geo Society grant in 1994. Here are a few retrospective shots from that first year of fieldwork, which we spent together (we're married) in the rainforest. Studying wild orangutans is tough work, but Cheryl and her team have persevered for 25 years to shed light on the behavior of this now critically endangered species. If you are in Toronto, come hear our NatGeo Live presentation “Adventures Among Orangutans” Feb 23-25. Or to learn more about Cheryl’s work, follow @savegporangutans. #GunungPalungNationalPark #orangutans #borneo #Indonesia #savewildorangutans
день назад
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Photos by Pete McBride @pedromcbride | Snow, silence, and negative space: The stillness of winter settles in across the Canadian Rockies. For more wild and quiet places, follow @pedromcbride. #winter #nature #woods #petemcbride #fineart
день назад
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Photos by Pete McBride @pedromcbride | Snow, silence, and negative space: The stillness of winter settles in across the Canadian Rockies. For more wild and quiet places, follow @pedromcbride. #winter #nature #woods #petemcbride #fineart
день назад
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Video by George Steinmetz @geosteinmetz | The dinghy of Ocean Expeditions pushes through the slush of calving glaciers on a survey of the bathymetry around Brabant Island, Antarctica. The west Antarctic Peninsula is one of the fastest warming areas on Earth, with a rapid loss of ice. To view more of our world from above, follow me @geosteinmetz.
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Photo by Jeff Kerby @jtkerby | Russia’s Kuril Islands are beautiful but evening at this cave on Ushishir was otherworldly. We had just raced across the island’s lagoon to capture the visual fireworks with biologist Vladimir Burkanov. "We’re five minutes too late!" he muttered, smiling as always. The gulls didn't seem to mind as they caught the last rays of light before all went dim. I often think about the photo that could have been if we'd gotten there a few minutes earlier. Alas, we can only capture the beauty we see. This place seems so rich with life but would seem comparatively empty to a visitor from a few centuries ago. A reminder that beauty in the present should not blind us to the beauty that has existed in the past, or that can exist in the future. Follow @jtkerby and the team for more. #FromKurilsWithLove
2 дня назад
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Photo by @chien_chi_chang | Of all human obsessions, one of the strongest, purest, and most universal is chasing a ball—or watching others do it. The most elemental of shapes complements our own elemental needs. Ball play builds teams. It allows the lonely to hope that they can bounce back. It defines and refines skills, propelling bodies into joyful movement through space. It can also propel the poor out of poverty. Everywhere I have traveled, from the grimmest of war zones to the temples of the mighty, I have seen a human with a ball—like this Burmese boy, in 2010, scribing a graceful arc toward the Bay of Bengal. #cccontheroad #MagnumPhotos
2 дня назад
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