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National Geographic
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Experience the world through the eyes of National Geographic photographers.
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Photo by Stephanie Sinclair @stephsinclairpix | A Sierra Leonean girl participates in an alternative rites of passage ceremony, which  welcomes her into "womanhood" but without the traditional practice of female genital mutilation (FGM). While some progress has been made in recent years, most females in the country have undergone FGM, and nearly half of all girls marry before age 18. Rooted in poverty, gender disparity, and lack of education, the practice is not limited to Sierra Leone, impacting hundreds of millions of women and girls across the globe—including the U.S. and Europe. While the world struggles to manage the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, we must remember that humanitarian crises disproportionately affect women and girls; and in many cases, pregnancy-related deaths spike and sexual violence soars. I founded the nonprofit @tooyoungtowed after covering these issues for @natgeo. We are working hard to mitigate this impact on some of the most vulnerable girls. For more information, follow us @tooyoungtowed. #protectgirls #endchildmarriage #COVID19
20 分鐘前
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Photo by @newshatavakolian | The minister of health, speaking on Iranian state television, states the number of COVID-19 deaths and infected people. Iran has moved slowly to contain the crisis. New rules for quarantine have recently been announced, but only after eight million people went on traditional holiday trips for the Persian new year. Now they will have to stay where they are. #Iran

Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
1 小時前
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Photo by @michaelnicknichols | Sita, Bandhavgarh National Park, India. This image was on the cover of the December 1997 issue. 
I mostly remember fear—fear of missing the gift she gave me in the form of this moment. I was actually shaking from the adrenaline rush when it happened—and shooting with a 200mm lens, where shaking matters. My platform was on the back of an elephant, which allowed me to enter into the tigers' world without much of a reaction on their part. Sita was moving her cubs, when she suddenly appeared in a small opening where I could see her clearly. That was it.
3 小時前
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Photo by @williamodaniels | Deserted Place Vendôme, in the center of Paris, on day four of the order to stay at home. 
There is currently a nationwide confinement order in France, but as of now journalists with press cards are still allowed to go out to report. Follow me on @williamodaniels for more coverage.
5 小時前
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Photo by Muhammed Muheisen @mmuheisen | A Bedouin leads his camels along the desert of Wadi Rum, also known as the Valley of the Moon, cut into the sandstone and granite rock of southern Jordan. For more photos and videos from different parts of the world, follow me @mmuheisen and @mmuheisenpublic #muhammedmuheisen #Jordan #الاردن #wadirum #desert
8 小時前
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Photo by @camillaferrariphoto | March 21, Milan, Italy, day 12 of the lockdown. I haven't left my house since March 9. I'm trying to stay as positive as I can, thankful to be healthy and that my family is healthy too. Here, my partner, Fabio, stretches in the living room, where reflections of buildings outside merge with the indoors. Hope you're all safe. If you have a choice, please, stay home.

Across the world, people are staying home—and that includes National Geographic photographers. We asked several to share their thoughts on the worlds they see inside—and just outside—their windows.
12 小時前
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Photos by Corey Arnold @arni_coraldo | My partner, Aly Nicklas, and I live in Portland, Oregon, with our six-week-old son, Wolfgang, and our husky puppy, Nooka Bear. I recently arrived home from an assignment out-of-state, joining the rest of my family in isolation. In some ways this time of quarantine is a continuation of what we've already been doing for the past six weeks—with a new baby, we're not out and about much in the world anyway, other than much-needed nature time for ourselves and our energetic pup. While the future of our health and our economy is concerning, the upside is spending more intimate time with family, reconnecting with old friends via digital means, and a forced slowing down of our fast-paced life. There's something about this time, while wildly uncertain, that can bring us closer together—while standing six feet apart. #covid19 #pandemic #coronavirus #family

Across the world, people are staying home—and that includes National Geographic photographers. We asked several to share their thoughts on the worlds they see inside—and just outside—their windows.
15 小時前
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Photos by Corey Arnold @arni_coraldo | My partner, Aly Nicklas, and I live in Portland, Oregon, with our six-week-old son, Wolfgang, and our husky puppy, Nooka Bear. I recently arrived home from an assignment out-of-state, joining the rest of my family in isolation. In some ways this time of quarantine is a continuation of what we've already been doing for the past six weeks—with a new baby, we're not out and about much in the world anyway, other than much-needed nature time for ourselves and our energetic pup. While the future of our health and our economy is concerning, the upside is spending more intimate time with family, reconnecting with old friends via digital means, and a forced slowing down of our fast-paced life. There's something about this time, while wildly uncertain, that can bring us closer together—while standing six feet apart. #covid19 #pandemic #coronavirus #family

Across the world, people are staying home—and that includes National Geographic photographers. We asked several to share their thoughts on the worlds they see inside—and just outside—their windows.
15 小時前
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Photos by @acacia.johnson | Unexpected reflections appear through the windows of my partner's apartment, near Gothenburg, Sweden, on the first day of our self-quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic. During quarantine, I've found myself making photographs in the same way I did when I first picked up a camera as a teenager–searching for quiet magic in the everyday. In this time of uncertainty, it's comforting to recognize the beauty in the small details all around us. #everydaymagic #selfquarantine #covid19

Across the world, people are staying home—and that includes National Geographic photographers. We asked several to share their thoughts on the worlds they see inside—and just outside—their windows.
18 小時前
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Photos by @acacia.johnson | Unexpected reflections appear through the windows of my partner's apartment, near Gothenburg, Sweden, on the first day of our self-quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic. During quarantine, I've found myself making photographs in the same way I did when I first picked up a camera as a teenager–searching for quiet magic in the everyday. In this time of uncertainty, it's comforting to recognize the beauty in the small details all around us. #everydaymagic #selfquarantine #covid19

Across the world, people are staying home—and that includes National Geographic photographers. We asked several to share their thoughts on the worlds they see inside—and just outside—their windows.
18 小時前
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Photos by Ivan Kashinsky @ivankphoto | My family walked near our home in Topanga, part of the L.A. area, as California Governor Gavin Newsom issued a statewide stay-at-home order last week. It is beautiful to slow down and spend so much time together as a family, but it can also drive us nuts. Our savior has been nature. We take a long evening walk every day, and the trails seem to heal our minds as we head into the unknown.

Across the world, people are staying home—and that includes National Geographic photographers. We asked several to share their thoughts on the worlds they see inside—and just outside—their windows.
21 小時前
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Photos by Ivan Kashinsky @ivankphoto | My family walked near our home in Topanga, part of the L.A. area, as California Governor Gavin Newsom issued a statewide stay-at-home order last week. It is beautiful to slow down and spend so much time together as a family, but it can also drive us nuts. Our savior has been nature. We take a long evening walk every day, and the trails seem to heal our minds as we head into the unknown.

Across the world, people are staying home—and that includes National Geographic photographers. We asked several to share their thoughts on the worlds they see inside—and just outside—their windows.
21 小時前
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Photos by @luisadorr | In Bahia, Brazil, we don't have the infrastructure required for an epidemic: The closest functional hospital is two hours away, and probably already saturated. And in this region, there are few ICU beds available. The vast majority of care facilities are basic. I talked to an area doctor who explained what's he's seen so far. Most of the public isn't aware of the situation, in order to avoid widespread panic. It's extremely chaotic, and cases are underreported—there is no way to test everyone because there almost no tests in the region. It is impossible to know the real numbers.

Across the world, people are staying home—and that includes National Geographic photographers. We asked several to share their thoughts on the worlds they see inside—and just outside—their windows.
1 天前
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Photos by @luisadorr | In Bahia, Brazil, we don't have the infrastructure required for an epidemic: The closest functional hospital is two hours away, and probably already saturated. And in this region, there are few ICU beds available. The vast majority of care facilities are basic. I talked to an area doctor who explained what's he's seen so far. Most of the public isn't aware of the situation, in order to avoid widespread panic. It's extremely chaotic, and cases are underreported—there is no way to test everyone because there almost no tests in the region. It is impossible to know the real numbers.

Across the world, people are staying home—and that includes National Geographic photographers. We asked several to share their thoughts on the worlds they see inside—and just outside—their windows.
1 天前
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Photo by @newshatavakolian | I hate the term social distancing. I became a photographer to show people, their struggle from suffering to success, and everything in between. Keeping distance isn't what we do as humans; we want to be close and not apart. I cant wait for this time to be over. This is the view from my apartment during social distancing. #Iran

Across the world, people are staying home—and that includes National Geographic photographers. We asked several to share their thoughts on the worlds they see inside—and just outside—their windows.
1 天前
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Photos by @lucalocatelliphoto I My mother’s quarantine diary is a series of photos about protecting the most vulnerable people during the COVID-19 epidemic. Sharing our experience in Italy may help prevent the tragedies we’re living in other parts of the world. To date, Italy is the most affected country, with almost 7,000 deaths, and average age of victims is around 80. It’s important to lock down your parents or grandparents now. My mother is 82 years old, a strong, stubborn Italian woman. She was a kid during WWII, and she's fought a lot during her life, which makes it hard to convince her to stay inside. It's sad that I can't let her see her grandchildren, and that I'm unable to hug her.  My brothers and I are cautious around her, and we bring her food. During the time I spend with her, my camera has become a way to protect me from reality, and at the same time makes me feel more emotional. After almost three weeks, it's become our ritual, the point of connection between us—and the sad reality we are living every day. 
The images: My mother, called Gigia, irons her grandchildren's clothing in the garden. She demands to be active rather than staying put. My brother Fabio and his wife, Veronica (second image), talk to my mother at the her apartment's entrance. They wear masks to protect her. Third image: My mother and my brother  joke around on her porch. I photograph her from a distance of more than two meters (yards) while wearing a mask. Spring is blooming (last image), and daises are my mother's favorite flower. These on my kitchen table are from my mother's garden, where she picks them for her grandchildren. Follow Gigia's diary @lucalocatelliphoto @lucalocatellidaily

Across the world, people are staying home—and that includes National Geographic photographers. We asked several to share their thoughts on the worlds they see inside—and just outside—their windows.
2 天前
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Photos by @lucalocatelliphoto I My mother’s quarantine diary is a series of photos about protecting the most vulnerable people during the COVID-19 epidemic. Sharing our experience in Italy may help prevent the tragedies we’re living in other parts of the world. To date, Italy is the most affected country, with almost 7,000 deaths, and average age of victims is around 80. It’s important to lock down your parents or grandparents now. My mother is 82 years old, a strong, stubborn Italian woman. She was a kid during WWII, and she's fought a lot during her life, which makes it hard to convince her to stay inside. It's sad that I can't let her see her grandchildren, and that I'm unable to hug her.  My brothers and I are cautious around her, and we bring her food. During the time I spend with her, my camera has become a way to protect me from reality, and at the same time makes me feel more emotional. After almost three weeks, it's become our ritual, the point of connection between us—and the sad reality we are living every day. 
The images: My mother, called Gigia, irons her grandchildren's clothing in the garden. She demands to be active rather than staying put. My brother Fabio and his wife, Veronica (second image), talk to my mother at the her apartment's entrance. They wear masks to protect her. Third image: My mother and my brother  joke around on her porch. I photograph her from a distance of more than two meters (yards) while wearing a mask. Spring is blooming (last image), and daises are my mother's favorite flower. These on my kitchen table are from my mother's garden, where she picks them for her grandchildren. Follow Gigia's diary @lucalocatelliphoto @lucalocatellidaily

Across the world, people are staying home—and that includes National Geographic photographers. We asked several to share their thoughts on the worlds they see inside—and just outside—their windows.
2 天前
下載
Photos by @lucalocatelliphoto I My mother’s quarantine diary is a series of photos about protecting the most vulnerable people during the COVID-19 epidemic. Sharing our experience in Italy may help prevent the tragedies we’re living in other parts of the world. To date, Italy is the most affected country, with almost 7,000 deaths, and average age of victims is around 80. It’s important to lock down your parents or grandparents now. My mother is 82 years old, a strong, stubborn Italian woman. She was a kid during WWII, and she's fought a lot during her life, which makes it hard to convince her to stay inside. It's sad that I can't let her see her grandchildren, and that I'm unable to hug her.  My brothers and I are cautious around her, and we bring her food. During the time I spend with her, my camera has become a way to protect me from reality, and at the same time makes me feel more emotional. After almost three weeks, it's become our ritual, the point of connection between us—and the sad reality we are living every day. 
The images: My mother, called Gigia, irons her grandchildren's clothing in the garden. She demands to be active rather than staying put. My brother Fabio and his wife, Veronica (second image), talk to my mother at the her apartment's entrance. They wear masks to protect her. Third image: My mother and my brother  joke around on her porch. I photograph her from a distance of more than two meters (yards) while wearing a mask. Spring is blooming (last image), and daises are my mother's favorite flower. These on my kitchen table are from my mother's garden, where she picks them for her grandchildren. Follow Gigia's diary @lucalocatelliphoto @lucalocatellidaily

Across the world, people are staying home—and that includes National Geographic photographers. We asked several to share their thoughts on the worlds they see inside—and just outside—their windows.
2 天前
下載
Photos by @lucalocatelliphoto I My mother’s quarantine diary is a series of photos about protecting the most vulnerable people during the COVID-19 epidemic. Sharing our experience in Italy may help prevent the tragedies we’re living in other parts of the world. To date, Italy is the most affected country, with almost 7,000 deaths, and average age of victims is around 80. It’s important to lock down your parents or grandparents now. My mother is 82 years old, a strong, stubborn Italian woman. She was a kid during WWII, and she's fought a lot during her life, which makes it hard to convince her to stay inside. It's sad that I can't let her see her grandchildren, and that I'm unable to hug her.  My brothers and I are cautious around her, and we bring her food. During the time I spend with her, my camera has become a way to protect me from reality, and at the same time makes me feel more emotional. After almost three weeks, it's become our ritual, the point of connection between us—and the sad reality we are living every day. 
The images: My mother, called Gigia, irons her grandchildren's clothing in the garden. She demands to be active rather than staying put. My brother Fabio and his wife, Veronica (second image), talk to my mother at the her apartment's entrance. They wear masks to protect her. Third image: My mother and my brother  joke around on her porch. I photograph her from a distance of more than two meters (yards) while wearing a mask. Spring is blooming (last image), and daises are my mother's favorite flower. These on my kitchen table are from my mother's garden, where she picks them for her grandchildren. Follow Gigia's diary @lucalocatelliphoto @lucalocatellidaily

Across the world, people are staying home—and that includes National Geographic photographers. We asked several to share their thoughts on the worlds they see inside—and just outside—their windows.
2 天前
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